ABOUT
When my mother came up with the name of her first cookbook the term "All-American" only seemed fit. After all, she was 1st generation Chinese married to an American, Irish, Norwegian man living in Nebraska where traditional Chinese ingredients were not made readily available. It isn't until now that I truly understand the meaning of the All-American... (read more)

Posts Tagged ‘Pork’

15

Jan

2009

Pan Fried Gyoza Dumplings

My mother makes hands down the best Chinese Potstickers. Here’s a convenient take on her traditional recipe which requires no dough making! The Gyzoa is a like small sized Potsticker with thinner dough. It’s traditionally a Chinese hors d’oeuvre made popular by the Japanese and a hit with just about everyone I know!

1 package fresh gyoza skin wrappers (12 oz. or 14 oz.)*
1/2 cup water for sealing  the gyoza
Canola oil or Pam cooking spray
1 cup water (divide 4 times for cooking each batch of gyoza)

Filling:
½ pound head cabbage (8 oz.)
1 teaspoon salt and ¼ cup water to marinade the cabbage
1 pound lean ground pork
2 scallions, including the green top
2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger root
1 egg
2 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
2 teaspoons pure sesame oil
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon sugar

Sauce for Dipping:
3 tablespoons soy sauce
4 tablespoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon red hot chili oil (optional)

Preparation:
Shred cabbage and finely chop. In a bowl, mix the cabbage with 1 teaspoon salt and ¼ cup water. Use one hand to mix the cabbage with the salt water for 1 minute. Leave the cabbage to rest and marinade in the bowl for at least 15 minutes.

Wash and trim the green onions, finely chop. Peel and finely grate the fresh ginger root. Use another bowl to combine the ground pork with the onions, ginger root, egg, soy sauce, sesame oil, salt and sugar. Mix together thoroughly and set aside.

Use both hands to pick up a small amount of marinated cabbage and squeeze to drain the salt water from the cabbage. Drop into the meat mixture bowl. Continue until all the cabbage has been squeezed dry of salt water. Mix the cabbage with the meat mixture together thoroughly and set aside.

To Assemble:
In a small bowl, fill 1/2 cup water for assembling the gyoza. Place a round gyoza wrapper in the palm of your hand. Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the center of the wrapper (careful not to overstuff the wrapper). Use the fingers of your free hand to moisten all sides of the exposed dough (around the filling) with water. Fold the wrapper in half and pinch the top. Then crimp each side of dough tightly with your fingers to seal. Tap the sealed dumpling to flatten its bottom so that it stands upright. Repeat to finish assembling all the gyoza.**

To Cook:
Spray cooking oil onto a non-stick 10 inch frying pan over medium heat. Place about 16 gyoza dumplings in the pan. Add ¼ cup water to pan, cover with lid and cook for approximately 6 to 7 minutes. When the water is absorbed and the bottom of gyoza is lightly browned, the dumplings are ready. Serve immediately or use spatula to transfer the gyoza onto a cookie sheet, cover with tinfoil (so the gyoza skin will not dry out) and keep warm in the oven. Repeat to cook remaining gyoza. Serve with dipping sauce if desired.

Makes 60 to 65 gyoza
Preparation time: 1-½ hours
Cooking time: 4 batches about 25 to 28 minutes

*Gyoza Wrappers are 3 inch round, thin, soft, fresh flour dough. They come in about 65 pieces and are sold next to the wonton wrappers in the produce section of most supermarkets.
**You can make the gyoza ahead of time and freeze on a flat tray. Once frozen, transfer to a freezer bag and keep frozen for later use.


20

Nov

2008

Stir-Fry Brussels Sprouts

I know, many of you may be thinking “Yuck! I hate brussels sprouts”.  I only started liking brussels sprouts recently because of my father-in-law. Now I love them. And since it’s the season, some of you may want to try this recipe as a Thanksgiving side dish. We happen to think that Chinese-style is the most delicious way to prepare them so we figured it’s worth a shot…

1 pound brussels sprouts
4 strips of hickory smoked bacon
½ small yellow onion
2 teaspoons cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water
4 cups water (for boiling the brussels sprouts)
1 tablespoon soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
2 teaspoons white vinegar
1 teaspoon pure sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon sugar

Preparation:
Wash and trim the ends of the brussels sprouts. Cut each brussels sprout lengthwise in half. Cut bacon into ½ inch pieces. Cut onion into ½ inch chunks. In a small bowl, dissolve 2 teaspoons of cornstarch with 2 tablespoons of water.

To Cook:
Bring water to a boil. Add the brussels sprouts to the boiling water and blanch for approx. 7 to 8 minutes (until they are almost tender). Drain water and set aside. Heat a non-stick wok or a frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the bacon pieces. Cook and stir until the bacon caramelizes for about 3 to 4 minutes. Add onions, cook and stir for 1 minute. Add the cooked brussels sprouts, soy sauce, vinegar, sesame oil and sugar to wok. Stir-fry for 2 more minutes. Add dissolved cornstarch to wok, and stir-fry for a few seconds until the liquid thickens and adheres to the sprouts.

Makes 4 to 6 servings
Preparation time: 15 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes


28

Oct

2008

Mu Shu Pork (and hold the “Mu Shu” please)


Because we are the “All-American” Chinese cookbook we have developed a yummy recipe that takes the “mu shu” out of the Mu Shu Pork. In case you are wondering what makes mu shu, it’s dried wood ears, cloud ears and lilly buds. While it’s all very tasty, your local grocery store may not carry these items (and from my experience, your kids may pick them off of their plate anyway). So give our variation of this popular Mandarin dish a taste which may also be substituted with chicken or beef. And while you can buy a package of flour tortillas to substitute the homemade pancakes – we strongly suggest that you check out our homemade Mu Shu Pancake recipe to complete the dish!

1 pound lean pork
½ pound head cabbage (8 oz.)
4 scallions, including the green top
½ red bell pepper
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil (for cooking in a non-stick wok or a fry pan)
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure sesame oil
½ cup hoisin sauce*
Homemade flour pancakes

Marinade:
2 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1 teaspoon sugar

Preparation:
Slice pork against the grain into ¼ inch thin pieces and then cut into 1-½ inch long strips. In a bowl, combine the pork strips with the marinade ingredients. Mix together thoroughly and set aside. Shred cabbage into thin, 1 inch long strips. Wash and trim the green onions, slice diagonally into 1/2 inch wide pieces. Cut red bell pepper into thin, 1 inch long strips. Lightly beat eggs in a small bowl.

To Cook:
Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a non-stick wok or a large frying pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, pour in the beaten eggs and lightly scramble until firm. Transfer the cooked eggs into a bowl. Add another tablespoon of oil into the wok. Add the pork strips and stir-fry for approximately 2 minutes until the pork is nearly cooked through. Add shredded cabbage, onions, red bell pepper strips and scrambled eggs into wok. Stir-fry for 1 more minute. Add salt and sesame oil. Continue to cook for 30 seconds longer.

For best results, serve immediately, before the dish becomes too juicy.

To Serve:
Place a warm pancake on a plate. Spread 2 teaspoons of Hoisin sauce on the center of the pancake. Add a  ½ cup of the mu shu mixture in the center of the pancake. Fold each side into the center of the pancake. Roll the pancake from the bottom up creating a pouch around the mixture allowing for it to be picked up and eaten with your fingers. Enjoy!

Makes 4 servings
Preparation time: 25 minutes
Cooking time: 6 to 8 minutes

*Hoisin sauce is a sweet brown sauce made from soybeans.  Sold in jars and bottles at the Asian section of most supermarkets.  After opening, it can be stored for several months in the refrigerator.


29

Aug

2008

Easy Chinese Steamed Pork Buns

A few years back my mother stumbled upon a competition hosted by Pillsbury. I initially balked at the idea of making things from their branded biscuits. Afterall, we grew up eating fresh, homemade, healthy foods. We were the house that never, ever had sugared cereal! So when my mom stocked up on their buttery Grands! biscuits, I was secretly happy but wondered if she was loosing it? From taco shells to sticky buns, these delicious little biscuits can do anything. There’s even a tasty reduced fat version!


Without further adieu, here’s Lucy’s recipe with the store bought biscuit dough and all. They are truly delicious and make amazing hors d’oeuvres !

2 packages (10 per package) refrigerated buttermilk biscuits
2 tablespoons flour (for dusting the biscuits)
Canola oil or Pam cooking spray
½ cup water

Filling:
½ pound lean ground pork
2 scallions, including the green top
1 tablespoon soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 teaspoons pure sesame oil
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger root
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon sugar

Preparation:
Wash and trim the green onions, finely chop. Peel and finely grate the ginger root.  In a bowl, combine the ground pork with chopped onions, grated ginger root, soy sauce, cornstarch, sesame oil, salt and sugar. Mix together thoroughly and set aside.

On a cutting board, separate biscuits. Flatten each with fingertips and lightly dust with flour. Use a rolling pin to roll each biscuit into a 3-½ inch round shape, approximately 1/8-inch thick.

Place the flattened biscuit dough onto the palm of your hand. Place 1 tablespoon of pork filling in the center of the biscuit and with your other hand, gather the sides of the biscuit dough around the filling, letting the biscuit dough pleat naturally. Pinch the top of the dough to seal. Tap the little biscuit bun to flatten its bottom so it stands upright. Repeat to make all the buns.

To Cook:
Spray cooking oil in a 10-inch non-stick frying pan over medium-low heat. Place 10 biscuit buns in the pan, leaving 1/2 inch space between each bun. Add half (¼ cup) of the water to the pan and cover. Cook for 10 to 12 minutes, until the water is absorbed and the bottom of the buns are lightly browned. The buns size will double.

Transfer the cooked pork buns onto a plate or lined breadbasket. Cover with tinfoil to keep them warm. Repeat to cook another 10 buns.

Makes 20 pork buns
Preparation time: 30 minutes
Cooking time: 20 to 24 minutes


31

Jul

2008

Pork Fried Rice

A true family favorite. Of course it looks prettier with bits of red Chinese BBQ Pork rather than ground pork, but this dish gets the same flavors across. Best of all, your kids will be asking for more!

6 cups cooked rice
½ pound lean ground pork
3 eggs
2 scallions, including the green top
¾ cup frozen peas and carrot
2 tablespoons canola or vegetable oil (for cooking in a non-stick wok or a fry pan)
2 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
2 teaspoons pure sesame oil
1 teaspoon salt

Marinade:
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon cornstarch
½ teaspoon sugar

Preparation:
In a small bowl, mix the ground pork with the marinade ingredients together and set aside.  In another small bowl, lightly beat the eggs.  Wash and trim the green onions, finely chop.

To Cook:

Heat oil in a non-stick wok or a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, brown onions for a few seconds. Add the marinated ground pork. Cook and stir until the pork is almost cooked through for approximately 2 minutes. Add frozen peas and carrots and stir well. Add the beaten eggs. Cook and stir for 2 to 3 minutes until the egg mixture becomes firm. Add the cooked rice, soy sauce, sesame oil and salt into wok. Mix all ingredients together and cook for 2 to 3 more minutes. Serve hot.

Makes 6 to 8 servings
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 9 minutes

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