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When my mother came up with the name of her first cookbook the term "All-American" only seemed fit. After all, she was 1st generation Chinese married to an American, Irish, Norwegian man living in Nebraska where traditional Chinese ingredients were not made readily available. It isn't until now that I truly understand the meaning of the All-American... (read more)

Archive for June, 2009

24

Jun

2009

Roasted Pork Tenderloin

Cantonese style roasted pork can only be found in Chinatown. By cooking this easy recipe at home, the outcome is similar in flavor and produces very tender pork with minimal fat.


1 package fresh pork tenderloin, 2 whole pieces (about 2-1/4 pounds)
Canola oil or Pam cooking spray

Marinade:
¼ cup hoisin sauce*
3 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
1 tablespoon white vinegar
2 teaspoons red hot chili oil

Preparation:
Rinse the fresh pork tenderloins with cold water and pat dry with paper towels. In a large bowl or zip lock bag, mix the marinade ingredients together. Add the pork into the marinade and coat well. Cover (or zip) and refrigerate for 2 hours or longer.

To Cook:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. For easy clean up, spray cooking spray onto a 9×12 roasting pan. Place the marinated pork tenderloins into the pan. Save the remaining marinade for use later. Roast the pork uncovered for 30 minutes. Turn the tenderloins over and pour the remaining sauce on top. Continue to roast the pork for another 30 minutes. Remove from oven and let the tenderloins cool for approximately 10 minutes before slicing. Pour any remaining juice over the sliced pork to serve.

Makes 6 to 8 servings
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Marinating time: 2 hours or longer
Cooking time: 1 hour

*Hoisin sauce is a sweet brown sauce made from soybeans. Sold in jars or bottles at the Asian section of most supermarkets. After opening, it can be stored for several months in the refrigerator.


17

Jun

2009

Ants Climb the Tree

This is a traditional Szechwan style dish. The ground beef symbolize little ants while the bean threads represent the tree branches. Bean Threads or Bean Thread Noodles are also known as “Saifun” made with mung beans and are found within the Asian section of most supermarkets.


½ pound 90% lean ground beef
1 package (3 pack tray, net wt. 5.29 oz.) bean threads / bean thread noodles
6 medium size shiitake dried black mushrooms
½ can sliced water chestnuts (2.5 oz.) drained
3 cloves garlic
2 scallions, including the green top
2 teaspoons finely grated fresh ginger root
1 teaspoon dried crushed red chili peppers
1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil (for cooking in a non-stick wok or a fry pan)

Sauce:
3 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
2 tablespoons rice wine or cooking sherry wine
2 tablespoons water
1 tablespoon white vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
2 teaspoons pure sesame oil
¼ teaspoon salt

Preparation:
Soak the bean threads in warm water for 10 minutes until soft. Drain water. Use one hand to hold a bunch of bean threads on the cutting board and cut into 2 inches long pieces. Soak the mushrooms in warm water for 10 minutes until soft. Drain water from mushrooms, cut off stems if any and finely chop. Finely chop the water chestnuts. Crush, peel and mince the garlic. Wash and trim the green onions, finely chop. Peel and finely grate the fresh ginger root. In a small bowl, mix the sauce ingredient together and set aside.

To Cook:
Heat oil in a non-stick wok or a large frying pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, brown garlic, onions, ginger root and red chili peppers for a few seconds. Add ground beef and stir-fry for approximately 2 minutes. Add mushrooms, water chestnuts, bean threads and the sauce mixture. Lower heat to medium. Cook and stir constantly for approximately 3 to 4 minutes until the bean threads are soft and transparent in color. Turn off heat and let the bean threads rest in the wok or pan for 5 to 10 minutes. They will expand just a bit. Serve warm with steamed rice or create a hand roll with lettuce leaves.

Makes 4 to 6 servings
Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 7 minutes


8

Jun

2009

Stir-Fry Bok Choy

Bok Choy is readily available in the vegetable section of most supermarkets. It’s a member of Chinese cabbage family. Often, Bok Choy can be very large. If that is the case, just cut in half lengthwise. The other half will keep fresh in the refrigerator for at least one week.

Stir-fry Bok Choy is very tasty and my family gives this recipe the thumbs up. As an alternative however, you can also blanch or steam the Boy Choy then drizzle with Oyster Sauce and serve.


1 pound fresh Bok Choy
2 cloves garlic
1 teaspoon finely grated fresh ginger root
1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil (for cooking in a non-stick wok or a fry pan)
1 tablespoon soy sauce (Kikkoman brand)
1 teaspoon pure sesame oil
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon sugar

Preparation
Trim the ends and wash each stalk well. Lengthwise cut each stalk once or twice (depends on the size of the stalk), about ½ inch wide. Crosswise cut the stalks into 2 inch chunks. Crush, peel and finely chop the garlic. Peel and finely grate ginger root

To Cook
Heat oil in a non-stick wok or a frying pan over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, brown garlic and ginger for a few seconds. Add Bok Choy. Cook and stir for about 1 minute. Add soy sauce, sesame oil, salt and sugar. Cook and stir for another 2 to 3 minutes until the green leaves are soft and the white parts are tender but still crunchy. Serve hot or warm.

Makes 4 servings
Preparation time: 6 minutes
Cooking time: 3 to 4 minutes


2

Jun

2009

Stir-Fry Black Mussels

Fresh black pacific mussels are both sweet and tender. This dish may be served either as an appetizer or as an entire meal for two.


1 bag black pacific live mussels (2-pounds)
4 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil (for cooking in a non-stick wok or a fry pan)
½ cup chicken broth
2 tablespoons oyster sauce*
2 tablespoons rice or cooking sherry wine
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water

Preparation:
Discard any opened mussels, if any. Wash and scrub the mussels. Crush, peel and finely chop the garlic. In a small bowl, dissolve 1 tablespoon cornstarch with 2 tablespoons water together and set aside.

To Cook:
Heat oil in a non-stick wok over medium high-heat. When the oil is hot, brown garlic for a few seconds. Add chicken broth, oyster sauce, wine, salt and sugar. Cook and stir until the mixture is brought to a boil. Add cleaned mussels to wok. Stir-fry for approximately 3 to 4 minutes, until all the mussels’ shells are opened. Push the mussels to the sides of the wok. Stir again and add the dissolved cornstarch to the sauce in the center of wok. Stir until the sauce thickens. Thoroughly mix the sauce with the mussels and serve hot.

Makes 2 to 4 servings
Preparation time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 6 minutes

*Oyster sauce by the bottle is sold at the Asian section of the most supermarkets. After opening, it can be stored for several months in the refrigerator.

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